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Tuesday, October 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Stubble-mulch farming to hold soil and water found in the catalog.

Stubble-mulch farming to hold soil and water

F. L. Duley

Stubble-mulch farming to hold soil and water

by F. L. Duley

  • 375 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Tillage.,
  • Stubble mulching.,
  • Soil conservation.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesStubble mulch farming to hold soil and water.
    Statementby F.L. Duley and J.C. Russel.
    SeriesFarmers" bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture ;, no. 1997, Farmers" bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) ;, no. 1997.
    ContributionsRussel, J. C. 1889-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsS21 .A6 no. 1997
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. :
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL237987M
    LC Control Numberagr48000432
    OCLC/WorldCa5879391

    BIOLOGICAL SOIL CONSERVATION Conservation Tillage. This umbrella term can include reduced tillage, minimum tillage, no-till, direct drill, mulch tillage, stubble-mulch farming, trash farming, strip tillage, plough-plant (for details see Mannering and Fenster ). Conservation tillage is a common practice that creates a mulch on the soil surface. Unlike the once common practice of plowing all crop residue into the soil, conservation tillage leaves the crop residue on top of the soil. These pieces of corn stalk, straw, or bean stems help protect the soil against wind and water .

    Stalk mulch on the soil surface effectively prevents soil water from evaporating and runoff, allowing rainwater to infiltrate into the soil in a timely manner (Li et al., ; Xie et al., ). The increased water status in topsoil layers with no-till also promoted crop root development (Huang et al., a).   Soil water holding capacity is a term that all farms should know to optimize crop production. Simply defined soil water holding capacity is the amount of water that a given soil can hold for crop capacity is the point where the soil water holding capacity has reached its maximum for the entire field. The goal for agricultural producers is to maintain the field at or near capacity.

      The tilled soil–similar to the dry, brown soil on Cobb’s farm—dissolved in water like dust. The soil from the pasture stayed together in a clump, keeping its structure and soaking up the. Start by marking “The Drought-Resilient Farm: Improve Your Soil’s Ability to Hold and Supply Moisture for Plants; Maintain Feed and Drinking Water for Livestock when Rainfall Is Limited; Redesign Agricultural Systems to Fit Semi-arid Climates” as Want to Read/5(5).


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Stubble-mulch farming to hold soil and water by F. L. Duley Download PDF EPUB FB2

OCLC Number: Notes: Contribution from Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station. Supersedes his Using crop residues for soil defense (Miscellaneous publication no. ) and L.S. Carter's Stubble-mulch farming for soil defense (Farmers' bulletin no.

A system of farming is described in which the residues of the crops grown on the land are used as a mulch to conserve soil and water.

Since the residue includes the stubble plus other parts of the crop, this kind of farming has come to be called stubble-rnulch farming. Instead of removing destroying or ploughing-under the residue it is left on the surface of the by: 4.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk.

Software. An illustration of two photographs. Stubble-mulch farming for soil defense Item Preview remove-circle. Stubble mulching is demonstrated to be of practical value in reducing soil erosion by wind and water and in resisting surface runoff.

Under some conditions, the practice of stubble mulching may reduce soil losses from intense rains to only a portion of those occurring with plowing. Corresponding runoff reductions can also be by: Stubble-mulch farming is a year-round way of managing plant residues on cropland.

Harvest- ing, cultivating, seedbed preparation, and plant- ing are all done so as to leave residues of the pre- vious crop on top of or near the surface of the soil until after the next crop is seeded. Such residues reduce the impact of raindrops on the soil surface.

Rainfall levels are rarely optimal, but there are hundreds of things you can do to efficiently conserve and use the water you do have and to reduce the impact of drought on your soil, crops, livestock, and farm or ranch ecosystem.

Author Dale Strickler introduces you to the same innovative systems he used to transform his own drought-stricken family farm in Kansas into a thriving, water-wise. The Drought-Resilient Farm: Improve Your Soil’s Ability to Hold and Supply Moisture for Plants; Maintain Feed and Drinking Water for Livestock when Systems to Fit Semi-arid Climates [Strickler, Dale] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Drought-Resilient Farm: Improve Your Soil’s Ability to Hold and Supply Moisture for Plants; Maintain Feed and Drinking Water for Reviews: considerable water erosion may be fol­ lowed by dry years with serious wind erosion and limited soil moisture for crop production.

Cultural practices gen­ erally used in the production of the principal crops, wheat and sorghum, tend to expose the soil during certain times of the year, leaving it vulnerable to erosion. Stubble mulch farming is. "Stubble-mulch farming, spectacular in its recent spread across the West, has sound scientific support.

In one form or another, it has been demonstrating its advantages on experimental plots and in isolated field trials for many years. It is a practice that furthers the highest crop and livestock production compatible with the principle of soil security.

Stubble Mulch farming leaves crop residue in the field so the roots would hold onto the soil during a fallow period. "Tillage practices were changed as a result of the Dust Bowl to use less intensive tillage, known as stubble mulch." Dr. Bob Stewart, professor of Agricultural Science.

Stubble-mulching refers to leaving the stubble or crop residue essentially in place on the land as a surface cover during a fallow period. Stubble-mulching can prevent soil erosion from wind or water and conserve soil moisture. References This article incorporates public domain material from the Congressional Research Service document: Jasper Womach.

Stubble Mulch. The blade plow or sweep plow, a common tillage implement in the High Plains, cuts weeds at the roots and leaves most of the residue anchored at the surface with minimum disturbance of the soil surface. Rogers Memorial Farm Yields Soil & Water Management Structure Biological Life Residue Water.

Contact Us. Paul Jasa Extension. Stubble-mulch farming to hold soil and water. [F L Duley; J C Russel] [F L Duley; J C Russel] Performance of Tillage Implements in a Stubble Mulch System: III. Stubble Mulch Tillage or Stubble Mulch Farming In this tillage, soil is protected at all times either by growing a crop or by leaving the crop residues on the surface during fallow periods.

Sweeps or blades are generally used to cut the soil up to 12 to 15 cm depth in the first operation after harvest and the depth of cut is reduced during. In his book The Bio-Integrated Farm, Shawn Jadrnicek recommends that in order to build this drain, start at the outlet - a pond, retention basin, swale, or some other area with the capacity to hold and safely release the harvested water, and move down the slope towards the desired irrigated area.

Top soil was removed, the soil was compacted with standard construction type equipment and 3 cm of top soil was replaced. Trees as well as grass were then planted to mimic a normal backyard. The trees were treated in a variety of ways; only water, compost tea, commercial bacterial concoction, wood chips, compost or fertilizer.

Soil is tilled as often as necessary to control weeds during interval between two crops. Good management of stubble mulch farming system begins with the harvest of the crop.

Stubble mulch tillage, however, presents practical problems. The residue left on the surface interferes with seed bed preparation and sowing operations.

Farming terraced land Stripcropping Rotations Contour tillage and terraces Ill Liming, fertilizing, and manuring Stubble-mulch farming Width of strips Grass waterways Managing stripcropped fields Cover crops Soil-depleting, soil-conserving, and soil-building crops Soil-depleting crops Instant coffee.

If you have to pay per gallon or cubic foot, you might reconsider trout farming and try a camel dairy instead. Soil quality: As with water, high-quality soil is a must for most farmers. Ask the current owner for soil test results.

Soil tests are often available through the local extension service and sellers should expect to provide test results. Stubble mulch definition is - a lightly tilled mulch of plant residue used to prevent erosion, conserve moisture, and add organic matter to the soil.

OCLC Number: Description: pages illustrations 24 cm. Contents: Introductory and geographical aspects --Man's ancient struggle with soil erosion --Soil erosion and related problems --Fundamental considerations of soil conservation --How water erodes soil --How wind erodes soil --Soil aggregates and how they are formed --Maintaining soil structure --Soil surveys --Soil testing.Excellent reference for simple techniques and projects to improve soil quality and water retention on your farm/ranch.

Read more. Helpful. Comment Report abuse. Jerri B. out of 5 stars Great info and layout! Reviewed in the United States on Septem Verified s: Crops planted up and down hillsides or in straight vertical rows allow water runoff to flow through, washing away the topsoil.

Conversely, contour plowing slows water runoff and as such, prevents soil erosion and allows the water to infiltrate the soil. Counter plowing is proven to increase crop yields from 10% up to 50%. Practicing organic farming.